Hate Your Job? Three Ways to Get Your Groove Back

 

Itching to move on from your job? Even if you’ve been dubbed a “job-hopper” by your parents, friends, or even HR departments, fear not – you don’t have deep-set commitment issues that require therapy (not yet, anyway).

The truth is, you’re not alone. The average employee under the age of 30 changes jobs an average of every 28 months. This is in stark contrast to the oh-so-dedicated Baby Boomers who took their first job and went on to stay with the company for decades – many until retirement.

What’s caused this sudden shift in attitude? No, it’s not ADD brought on by too many hormones in our food and too much TV-watching as children. Current research suggests that this phenomenon actually has a lot to do with learning. Now more than ever before, we associate a lot of our personal growth with how much we grow in our careers. Are you moving up or taking on more responsibility? Improving your skills or being mentored? If not, then you’re probably starting to feel stagnant – maybe even beginning to dread going to work in the morning.

 

If you can’t change your place of employment just yet, you can make your job a bit more enjoyable again by proactively creating opportunities for yourself. Before you jump ship, put these three steps into action. Who knows – perhaps they’ll help you see your job in a whole new light.


1. Learn Something New Every Day

Often, we’re so wrapped up in our day-to-day tasks that we don’t notice all that we’re learning. Take a second to the identify times you learn something new. By making these moments more pronounced, you may see how many of them there really are. Alternatively, if you find yourself bored and left with a lot of down time at work, why not spend that free time brushing up on a skill that will help your career? Not only will this show initiative on your part, but it will also help pad your resume should you ever choose to move on.

2. Break Out of the Silo
When we lose interest in our jobs, it shows. Perhaps you’re so tuned out at work that your eyes glaze over during meetings and you wake up to find yourself drooling on PowerPoint printouts. To add some variety, why not break out of your silo and into another by helping another department figure out their issues? That cross-department insight may be exactly what they need. Not only will this demonstrate your willingness to help others, it will also show that you’re versatile and willing to take on new projects. Even if nobody takes note, you’ll still walk away feeling better about yourself. You go, girl.

3. See the Big Picture
What’s that? You hate your field? Maybe you’re not seeing the big picture. In almost any industry, there’s an innovator to get excited about. Search the Internet for other companies in your field, and you’re bound to find some pretty cool stuff. Take on a new challenge of bringing some of their ideas to your current employer. This will not only help to stir your creativity, it will also show initiative and industry know-how. Who knows… you may even land a new job title out of it.

Alternatively, if you didn’t go into this industry expecting to be spending your days standing over the copy machine doing your best Copy Meister impression, take a step back. Is this position the first step that will eventually lead you to bigger and better things? If so, remember- this is referred to as “paying your dues” for a reason. Instead of focusing on the here and now, keep your eye on the prize and understand that everything you’re doing today is helping you get one step closer to bigger and better things. Rome wasn’t built in a day – and neither are CEOs.

 

Remember: Just because you’re not a good fit for your current employer doesn’t mean you’re a bad fit for your industry. Instead of falling prey to “grass is always greener” syndrome and quitting your job on a whim, utilize these tips to improve your outlook and make work a little more bearable while you search for a company that better fits your interests and personality.

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Career, job