New York History

Situated in the northeastern U.S. and stretching from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, this mid-sized state (27th out of 50) has the third-highest population in the nation. When people think about New York state, they automatically conjure up dense, urban images of busy streets and Manhattan skyscrapers. However, the state of New York

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Not All Seniors Are Equal: Interpreting Trait Scores of the College Graduate

Abstract Costa and McCrae, in their work with the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, have established a developmental trend for the Big Five traits. According to their findings, as individuals age from about 18 to about 30, their scores on the traits of Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness tend to decrease, while scores on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness tend to increase.

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Just Management

Stray Comments Don’t Always Prove Age Bias Ms. Martin was a long-term, highly-valued employee of Lockheed Missiles & Space Company. In 1991, she was laid off as result of a stack ranking based on performance and seniority. She sued for age discrimination.

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Why Boards Often Fail To Curb Executive Pay

Last fall, Richard Grasso, the chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, was forced to resign following disclosure that he had accepted a $187.5 million compensation package. The chairman didn’t set his own salary, however. The board of directors set it. What was their rationale for approving a package of that magnitude? Was he being

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Discerning the Truth In Employment Data

Just as it’s been the principal benchmark that financial markets have used to evaluate the economic recovery for the past three years, job creation has become the central economic focus of the U.S. presidential campaign. Benjamin Disraeli’s statement on the three types of lies is appropriate because the way in which the employment statistics are

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Executives’ Pay Faces New Tactics

Activist shareholders are trying new tactics to rein in executive pay at U.S. companies, with proposals they hope will appeal to a broader group of investors. The new strategies include simpler, less prescriptive holder resolutions that don’t dictate executives’ pay packages. Instead, the new proposals seek to more closely align executive pay with corporate performance,

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New View of Retirement Takes Shape Overseas

When should an executive retire? The question is gaining urgency in Europe where, for years, companies and governments have pushed people to retire earlier than their American counterparts. The mindset in Europe was that this cleared room for younger executives and brought in fresh ideas. Now, in a shift, some European companies are pushing to

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Opportunity Knocks, And It Pays a Lot Better

Managers like to say employees leave companies because of bad bosses or lack of career growth. A new report suggests a more straightforward reason: money. In a survey of about 1,100 U.S. employees, 71% of top performers listed pay among the top three reasons they would consider leaving their employer. Yet in a sister survey

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Some Schools Are Selling Case Studies on the Web

Customers are moving to the Web. Traditional sales and distribution methods seem outdated. How fast can an enterprise adapt to the Internet age? At business schools, such high-stakes predicaments are ripe fodder for case studies. Amazon.com Inc.’s assault on traditional book retailing has been dissected at least 16 times in cases at Harvard Business School.

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The Stream of Labor Slows to a Trickle

How’s this for a glimpse of the future? For the next eight years, the labor market will continue to shrink, and your company will increasingly come to resemble a temporary employment agency. Bright, restless recruits who believe they have nothing more to learn from your firm will move on to other employers; your seasoned managers

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Sexual Harassment Rulings: Less than Meets the Eye

At the end of its last term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued two rulings that offer insight about employer liability for sexual harassment. The decisions (Faragher v. City of Boca Raton, No. 97-282, and Burlington Industries Inc. v. Ellerth, No. 97-569) were both hailed and condemned-hailed for establishing new rules for such cases, and condemned

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Legal Trends: Prevent Now or Pay Later

Recently the Supreme Court issued two decisions that attracted a great deal of attention. These decisions will make it easier for employees to sue and will provide them with an incentive to do so. However, they also give employers insight into ways to avoid harassment or end it before it becomes an actionable offense.

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